Law Enforcement discusses how to help a missing and endangered child

Local News

ODESSA, TEXAS (Big 2/ Fox 24)- It’s something no parent should have to go through, finding out their special needs child is missing and having to lean on Law Enforcement and the public to help find them.

Regional Amber Alert Coordinator, Cpl. Steve LeSueur, says there are now 6 different kinds of missing people alerts “amber alert, silver alert, the missing and in danger alert, the blue alert, the camel alert, and the clear alert.”

LeSueur says “every situation is different is this child missing, did they just go to their friend’s house, do they have a history of running away do they have a history of leaving or being lost.”

OPD says once they decide to send out an alert extensive research allows them to create a search map for missing and endangered alerts. The search map helps officers track their possible whereabouts.

He says “we take all of those factors into consideration studies have shown that when an Autistic child goes missing they’re more likely to be drawn towards water every single alert has its own criteria.”

According to Sgt. Gary Duesler with the Ector County Sheriff’s Office, it’s important not to confuse them with a lot of questions but there are things you can do if you come across a missing and endangered child.

“We don’t want to scare them we just want to say you know ‘hey, we just want to see if we can help you’ and get us over there as quickly as possible. Don’t put them in your car or do anything like that’. Make yourself known to the people that you’re there to try and help them and then try and call us as soon as possible so that we can get out there because we might have some information about them needing medication.”

OPD also conducts a class every year at UTPB where people can learn about the 6 different alerts and how to help if they come across a missing person.

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