COLUMBUS, Ohio (WDTN) — A controversial policy included in an Ohio bill requiring student athletes to undergo a medical examination of their genitals to verify their sex assigned at birth is likely to be removed, according to state Senate President Matt Huffman.

Under House Bill 151, if an athlete’s sex is disputed the person would be required to establish their sex by presenting a signed doctor’s statement indicating sex based on an internal and external reproductive anatomy exam, testosterone levels, and analysis of the child’s “genetic makeup”.

Huffman during a City Club of Cleveland forum Wednesday said he believed the provision, intended to identify transgender athletes who may be lying about their sex assigned at birth, was unnecessary because alternative and less invasive measures, like DNA testing, are already available, according to The Hill.

“I’m not sure why that’s in the bill, it’s unnecessary,” he said Wednesday during the forum, which featured former Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. “All of these tests can be done with a simple DNA swab.”

Huffman signaled that the bill, one of the most extreme transgender athlete bans introduced this year, as it currently reads would not make it through the Senate. Opponents have said forced genital exams would target young transgender athletes and put children at risk of sexual abuse, according to The Hill.

“That is a highlight that a lot of people like to talk about because it outrages a lot of people,” Huffman said of the provision, “but it’s not necessary, it’s not going to happen.”